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Lucky's Blog

Friday, July 13, 2018

To Be Outstanding You Must Stand Out




Do you stand out from your competition? What is your market differentiator? Are you working outside your comfort zone? It has been my experience over the years, that when I ask people these questions I usually get the same answers.

Do you stand out from your competition? Everyone thinks they stand out from their competition. Usually it is because they think they have the best team, or they offer better quality than their competitors. But when put to the test, this is rarely the case, at least not to the point that it is a true market differentiator. Everyone wants their company to be outstanding, but to really be outstanding you must stand out. So ask yourself, what am I doing to make myself standout? What value do I bring to the customer that others do not? You should know the answer to this at any given time on any given day. You should also understand that the market is changing every day, so what might make you different today may not make you different tomorrow.

What is your market differentiator? As previously discussed, this is what makes you stand out and you need to have an answer to this and constantly be testing its viability. I have known many good people that lost rapid market share because they were not constantly monitoring what makes them different and what value they bring to their customers that others cannot. This takes a lot of deep thought and being honest with yourself, which some people have a very hard time doing. I have a sign in my office that says “Thinking is hard work, which is why so few do it!” This is as true a statement as there is since so many business owners don’t take the time to stop and think about where the market is, where is it going, and how will I position myself to be ahead of the changes?

Are you working outside your comfort zone? Without a doubt if you answer no to this question you are on your way to ruin. I just finished reading a book by Mark Cuban called “How to win at the sport of business.” This is an excellent book and I have already suggested it to many people who own, run, or are starting a business. It is a very short and succinct book that gets straight to the point. In one part of the book he talks about how at any given moment there are thousands of other companies who are trying to kill your business. I love that part of the book and this is why you need to live outside your comfort zone and constantly be thinking about what makes you stand out today. Over the years I have mentored many people who have started, rescued, or run businesses and one of the most common things I hear is, “when is this going to get easier?” The answer is never! You must be out there every day blowing your customers away, offering them value that others cannot give, and planning for the future. If there are always thousands of other companies that are trying to kill your business, or at least steal your market share, then you don’t have time to be in a comfort zone. Also, what about the effects of technology on your business? What effect will that have on your value stream and market differentiators?

I can remember not that long ago I knew a woman who had her own successful business. She transcribed doctor’s recordings to a word document. She ran this business, and was one of the top in her field for decades, making a very good living. However, all at once a computer could do this work, or at least to her it was all at once. Now she no longer has that business. Mainly because she spent too much time in the comfort zone and assumed that as long as she was good at her job she would continue to have her business. Technology killed her business and it was a hard lesson for her to learn.

Owning or running a business should never get easy. If it does get easier then you are not trying hard enough. Owning or operating a business isn’t a sprint, it is a career long marathon. Just because you hire people, train people, and build an amazing team you need to continue to push yourself to live outside that comfort zone to stay relevant. To be completely honest, I have never understood the reason for anyone wanting to live inside their comfort zone. If you stop to think about it, the most amazing things in life happen when you are outside your comfort zone, so the more time you spend there, the more amazing moments you will have in your life. Sure it isn’t easy, but no-one ever said it would be easy. Owning or running a business is one of the hardest things you will ever do. It will test you every day, it will consume your entire life, it will make you question your own abilities, but it will also be one of the most rewarding things you can ever do in life. You get to serve people, help people, and help your team live the American Dream! I have said in many articles how hard it is to be the best in anything, but in order to be the best, you have to live outside your comfort zone. In other words in order to be outstanding you must stand out!

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Embrace The Suck



In today’s article I wanted to discuss the trials that come with business. I currently have a good friend and a family member that are starting their own businesses. This article is dedicated to them, but I am sure this will ring true to many of my followers.

I can remember a while back when a good friend of mine named Devo, made a decision to go into the Army. He used to be a roadie for my band and we had a lot of good times together. However, after his 21st birthday he decided he had to do something with his life. He made the decision he was going to join the Army, not only to get his life on track, but to also help him get into shape. You see he was a very large guy, standing about six feet four inches and weighing in at around 300 pounds. I remember the night before Devo left for basic training. Well, I remember the beginning of the night because we threw him a going away party. Devo was scared but excited at the same time. He had that same feeling inside that someone has when starting their own business, because you are excited about the possibilities, but scared at the same time about the unknown.

About six months after Devo left for basic training he came back to visit us. We couldn’t believe how great he looked and what good shape he was in. He must have lost 70 pounds and was solid as a rock. We caught up in between music sets and he was telling me about how hard it was for him going through basic training. Devo explained that he was never really an athletic guy, nor had he ever done any exercising in his life. So when he went to basic training it was a really tough experience. He went on to tell me about his sergeant and all the yelling he had to endure. I remember thinking to myself; I don’t think I could take someone yelling at me like that. When I asked him how he got through it he told me about a saying they had, “Embrace the suck”! Every time he was hurting, he would think about these words and mentally taught himself how to embrace the suck and push through any mental limitation he was trying to set on himself.

It has been decades since then but I still think about Devo and the term “embrace the suck”. I can remember when I was starting my first business and things would get rough, I would think about that term and it would help me push through.

Recently, I just started trying to get back into running. As some of you know, I  severely injured my ankle a couple years back and haven’t been able to get back into the swing of things without reinjuring my ankle. This whole article came to me yesterday while I was running right as I was starting to hit the wall of pain. For those of you who don’t know what that is, it is a term in the running world to describe a point you hit when running. For anyone who has even tried running you are probably familiar with this moment.  The wall of pain, it is the point when you are running and everything is hurting, your lungs, your legs, your feet, I mean everything. Then your mind starts messing with you. You are convinced this is as far as you can run. You begin questioning yourself and why you are even running in the first place.

I bring this up because there are many times in life when you hit that wall of pain. It doesn’t have to be when you are running, or even physical. You can hit the wall of pain mentally, physically, spiritually, or even in a relationship. I have been married to the most wonderful woman in the world for 31 years, but believe me we have had our share of walls of pain throughout our relationship.
When you are in the business world, and probably even more when you own your own business, you will hit the wall of pain multiple times, sometimes even in the same day. You can’t find the work, or when you find the work you can’t get the guys. You have a customer who won’t pay you and then you have to figure out how you are going to pay your team, or your suppliers.  You have a major piece of equipment break down and now you can’t get the job done until it is fixed. These are all examples of the wall of pain at work. It is at this point when your mind kicks in and starts questioning everything. Why am I doing this, I can’t take this anymore, why did I ever go into business for myself, I am not good enough or smart enough, etcetera. It is amazing how much your mind can mess with you, make you question your own capabilities, and destroy your self-confidence.

Here is the thing though, as anyone who is into running knows, if you push through that wall of pain, if you bust down these false barriers your mind inflicts on you, you suddenly start to get this rush of endorphins known as a runners high. You feel better than you ever have and can press on for miles.

The same holds true for business or any other part of your life. If you push through that wall of pain you will achieve amazing success. The one thing you have to keep in mind is that there is no up without down, there is no good without bad, and there is no success without failure. Remember that if it was easy then everyone would do it. You didn’t start down this road thinking it would be easy, you are doing this to transform your life. So “embrace the suck” and push through that wall of pain. When you get through it all you will feel so much better about yourself and what you can achieve. By embracing the suck and pushing through the wall of pain, it will make your victories feel that much better and you will teach yourself how to embrace the suck!

Thursday, June 21, 2018

What Is Character?



I have always believed that to be a person of strong character, you have to do the right thing when nobody is looking.  That is what this article is about, character. It is easy to do the right thing when all eyes are on you or to do the right thing knowing you will be praised for the act. But what about when no one is looking, or if the act will happen without you getting any acknowledgment?

I have always hired based on character, attitude, and aptitude rather than focusing on skills or experience. Skills can be learned, and experience means nothing if the experience someone has gained was in doing things wrong. Yesterday this hiring process resulted in an unexpected return. To tell the story, I have to go back several months to a service call performed by one of my team members.
Tony had a service call for a store we had under contract that was located in a large strip mall. When he completed his job, he was backing out to return to the shop and ended up backing into a light pole. This accident happened despite all the time and effort we put into training our team members in defensive driving and being aware of their surroundings. Now when he hit the pole, it didn’t knock the pole down, but it did cause a pretty significant dent in the side of the pole which damaged the structural integrity.

Our contract was with a company that occupied one of the stores located in the strip mall, not the strip mall. Since Tony parked towards the back of the parking lot, it would have been very easy for him to drive off and not tell anyone what had happened. However Tony was a person of strong character. So he immediately called his manager, Patrick and told him what happened.  This had to be a hard decision for Tony since he knew that calling in with an accident was not going to be a fun conversation, and would also require Tony to complete our company’s safe driving training all over again.

Once Patrick assessed that Tony was ok and no one was hurt, Patrick told Tony to see if there was a management office at the strip mall so we could report to them what happened. After Tony told Patrick he could not find any management office, Patrick told Tony to fill out an incident report, and wait for Patrick to see if he could reach someone at the strip mall’s management company.

Patrick was finally able to get in contact with Will, the property manager for the strip mall. Patrick explained what had transpired, and requested that Will allow us to fix the pole. Will asked Patrick to send over a copy of our insurance and licensing to verify we were legally allowed to work on the lighting pole, but told Patrick that as long as we are a bona fide company, he would have no issue with allowing us to perform the repairs. Patrick let Tony know and had Tony disconnect power from the pole, take the pole down for safety, quarantine off the area, and then pack up and head back to the shop.

Patrick called around to find the same exact pole to match the one that was damaged. Once he found the proper pole, he was informed there was a four week lead time before we could receive the pole. Patrick called Will, the strip mall manager, and informed him of the lead time, but assured him that we would verify the safety of the work area and as soon as the pole comes in we would be back out the next day and make the repairs. Will told Patrick that would be fine, but asked Patrick if he could change out the heads to LEDs since we were there anyway. He wanted his boss to see the difference between the existing HID lighting and the LEDs light spectrum. Will further stated we could send him a bill for the LED heads. Patrick told Will he would be happy to replace the heads with LEDs and that we would cover the cost difference to make up for all the trouble we caused. Will was ecstatic and thanked Patrick profusely. 

Four weeks later the pole came in, and Patrick notified Will and scheduled a crew to replace the pole. When Patrick called Will to let him know that the new pole was installed and working, Will thanked him and said he would be in touch. 

About a week later, Will called Patrick back and told him he was able to show his boss the LED lights, and his boss was sold on retrofitting out the entire parking lot with LED fixtures to replace the older HID fixtures. Will asked Patrick to get him a price and he would send it up to his boss for approval. Later that day Patrick sent the price, and by the following day, the purchase order was cut.

Patrick called Will after receiving the purchase order to thank him for the business and to set up a schedule for when we could plan the work. Will let Patrick know that the reason we got the work was because of the way we handled things with the damaged pole. Will immediately recognized the character it took for us to notify him about the accident. But that wasn’t all, he went on to tell Patrick that the way we did the work and how safe we were with quarantining the area also impressed his boss. Finally, he stated that our level of communication and the fact that we made his job so easy, he literally didn’t have to do anything and the pole was fixed and in better condition than before, is the reason we have earned their business. Will closed the phone call with Patrick by saying that they manage 18 other properties in the area and they will exclusively be using us moving forward.


In this story, the example of true character was demonstrated several times. Not just by Tony, but by Patrick as well. It would have been easy for either Tony or Patrick just to disappear and not say anything about what happened. Chances are no one would have been caught. It also would have been easy for Patrick to charge the customer for the LED fixtures, and maybe even cover the labor in the markup. However, Patrick and Tony chose to do the right thing when no one was looking. In the end, they were rewarded for their character, but that wasn’t the reason they did what they did. Tony and Patrick were people of character; they couldn’t help it! We spend a lot of money on training; we constantly teach our team about providing the Ultimate Customer Experience and instructing the industry’s best practices. But in the end, you can’t teach character, you either have it, or you don’t. Luckily for me, I am surrounded by people of strong character, and that is the foundation for providing the Ultimate Customer Experience, even when nobody is looking!

Thursday, June 7, 2018

Over the Edge



Today I wanted to write about the customer experience. While I have been called an expert in this area, I believe we all have to continually raise the bar if we want to continue to gain the competitive edge. Today I am going to tell you about my experience as a customer and where the contractor fell short.

Recently we had a bathroom remodel done in our home. We looked for the right contractor by asking many questions and reviewing several proposals from different contractors that wanted the job. We decided to go with; we will call them Company B. We choose Company B because we were talking directly with the owner and felt there was more of a personal touch by using them for our contractor of choice. There were several things discussed during the proposal stage, one of which being that I planned on doing all the electrical work myself since I am a licensed master electrician. 

Once we signed the contract Company B said they would be out the following week to start the demo. The first thing that happened was they were replacing a beam in our garage underneath the bathroom, and when it arrived, they offloaded it in our front yard. A 22-foot beam was just dropped in our yard with no warning. It just so happened that the next day was the schedule with our lawn guy to come out and cut our grass, which now couldn’t be done.

We reached out to the owner of Company B and told him that we need to have a schedule, so we know when people or materials are going to arrive. We can’t have surprises like this happened again. He apologized and said he would send a schedule. A couple of days later he called my wife and said that the demo crew would be there tomorrow. While this was some heads up, we still had not received a schedule. Since my wife didn’t have any hard plans, she said it was fine for them to come and start the demo that day.


Several people showed up that day, and started not only demo,but also started some of the improvements. I got home to a disaster but was glad to see progress. Then around 6 PM, after everyone left our doorbell rings and it is a plumber saying he is there to do work. We explained that I get up very early for work and I am usually in bed by 8 PM. The plumber said he wouldn’t be long, so my wife allowed him to work. The plumber didn’t leave until 10 PM and was banging and cursing the whole time. Later we found out that he was moonlighting and not a licensed plumber, so he had to work at night.

My wife received a call the next day from the owner telling her that the drywallers would be there the next day to start drywalling. I freaked out because how was I supposed to get the electric done if the drywall was already installed? I have a job, and it was made clear that I would need a weekend to work on the electric and get it done. The Owner told my wife it was only about an hour’s worth of work so he didn’t understand why I couldn’t do it when I got home. BTW, it wasn’t anywhere near an hours work; it was easily a full day’s work. Luckily, I was in a position that I could come home and get the work done, but it was a real inconvenience, and very poor planning and communication.

I could go on for pages and pages of all the horrible customer experiences we encountered during this four-week renovation, smoking in our home, leaving doors open with the A/C on for hours, cutting wood and drywall in the house, but I don’t want to bore everyone with all the details. Thank God it was only four weeks.

The owner did everything he could to try and make it up to us, but much of it could have been avoided had he just supplied us with a schedule and communicated better. One of the most important things to remember if you want to provide a great customer experience is respect. I teach this to every new team member we onboard. While we do not do any residential work, I think it is probably even more important if you do residential work to show the upmost respect to someone’s home and family when working. A simple schedule up front, better communication, and better training for his subs could have made a world of difference. 


We are planning another renovation in about six months, and we are still on the fence about giving Company B another shot. The owner did apologize, took our criticisms very well, and in the end, the completed job looks great! However, there are great lessons in respect and communication to be learned here to keep from pushing your customers over the edge.

Thursday, May 17, 2018

Over The Edge



Today I wanted to write about the customer experience. While I have been called an expert in this area, I believe we all have to continually raise the bar if we want to continue to gain the competitive edge. Today I am going to tell you about my experience as a customer and where the contractor fell short.

Recently we had a bathroom remodel done in our home. We looked for the right contractor by asking many questions and reviewing several proposals from different contractors that wanted the job. We decided to go with; we will call them Company B. We choose Company B because we were talking directly with the owner and felt there was more of a personal touch by using them for our contractor of choice. There were several things discussed during the proposal stage, one of which being that I planned on doing all the electrical work myself since I am a licensed master electrician. 

Once we signed the contract Company B said they would be out the following week to start the demo. The first thing that happened was they were replacing a beam in our garage underneath the bathroom, and when it arrived, they offloaded it in our front yard. A 22-foot beam was just dropped in our yard with no warning. It just so happened that the next day was the schedule with our lawn guy to come out and cut our grass, which now couldn’t be done.

We reached out to the owner of Company B and told him that we need to have a schedule, so we know when people or materials are going to arrive. We can’t have surprises like this happened again. He apologized and said he would send a schedule. A couple of days later he called my wife and said that the demo crew would be there tomorrow. While this was some heads up, we still had not received a schedule. Since my wife didn’t have any hard plans, she said it was fine for them to come and start the demo that day.


Several people showed up that day, and started not only demo,but also started some of the improvements. I got home to a disaster but was glad to see progress. Then around 6 PM, after everyone left our doorbell rings and it is a plumber saying he is there to do work. We explained that I get up very early for work and I am usually in bed by 8 PM. The plumber said he wouldn’t be long, so my wife allowed him to work. The plumber didn’t leave until 10 PM and was banging and cursing the whole time. Later we found out that he was moonlighting and not a licensed plumber, so he had to work at night.

My wife received a call the next day from the owner telling her that the drywallers would be there the next day to start drywalling. I freaked out because how was I supposed to get the electric done if the drywall was already installed? I have a job, and it was made clear that I would need a weekend to work on the electric and get it done. The Owner told my wife it was only about an hour’s worth of work so he didn’t understand why I couldn’t do it when I got home. BTW, it wasn’t anywhere near an hours work; it was easily a full day’s work. Luckily, I was in a position that I could come home and get the work done, but it was a real inconvenience, and very poor planning and communication.

I could go on for pages and pages of all the horrible customer experiences we encountered during this four-week renovation, smoking in our home, leaving doors open with the A/C on for hours, cutting wood and drywall in the house, but I don’t want to bore everyone with all the details. Thank God it was only four weeks.

The owner did everything he could to try and make it up to us, but much of it could have been avoided had he just supplied us with a schedule and communicated better. One of the most important things to remember if you want to provide a great customer experience is respect. I teach this to every new team member we onboard. While we do not do any residential work, I think it is probably even more important if you do residential work to show the upmost respect to someone’s home and family when working. A simple schedule up front, better communication, and better training for his subs could have made a world of difference. 

We are planning another renovation in about six months, and we are still on the fence about giving Company B another shot. The owner did apologize, took our criticisms very well, and in the end, the completed job looks great! However, there are great lessons in respect and communication to be learned here to keep from pushing your customers over the edge.


Thursday, May 10, 2018

Gotta Gain My Second



In today’s article I wanted to tell a story I haven’t told in a while. A few days back I was training a new team member on the Ultimate Customer Experience, and we got into talking about process improvement. We were both discussing how small incremental changes done consistently over time can have a huge impact on an organization. During this conversation, I was reminded of this story from my early football years. I used to use this story in many of my speaking engagements to explain the difference between good and great, so I figured I would share it today with everyone.

Many years ago when I was in high school, I played football for my high school team, the Southwest Miami High School Eagles. My primary position was Middle Linebacker, though I was known to play ironman football when needed. I was considered pretty good and had somewhat of a reputation around town. I will never forget when my coach came to me a few weeks before we were scheduled to play the South Miami High School Cobras. He was concerned about a defensive player that was known for eating quarterbacks. My coach asked me to play Left Guard for this game to try and slow this guy down, and give our quarterback a chance. I will admit I already had heard about this player and his almost superhuman strength and speed.

So over the next few weeks, I prepared by doing extra offensive drills, stepping things up in the weight room, and watching endless hours of film with my coach to make sure I was prepared and ready to knock this guy down a peg or two and continue our winning streak that year.
So after weeks of preparation, it was game time. We were the visiting team, so we arrived early to warm-up and start running drills. As we were warming up, I saw the guy I had been preparing for walk out of their locker room and start heading towards the field. I can remember thinking to myself, that is the guy all the drama has been about? He wasn’t that large in stature, and while you can tell he spent a lot of time in the weight room, he wasn’t what I expected. After warm-ups and before the start of the game, we had the ceremonial handshake portion where we all meet in the middle of the field before the start of the game. I went straight to him looked him straight in the eyes and said, “How are you doing? I heard you’re the second-best defensive player in Florida.” Without missing a beat and with a blank stare he said, “Funny, I heard the same thing about you.” After about what seemed like 5 seconds of hostile silence, he smiles and we started laughing. We chatted for about another 5 mins before we had to head to our sides of the field.
The Eagles won the coin toss, so we got the ball first. I was going to get to see what this guy was all about right out of the gate. As I trotted out onto the field, I would be lying if I didn’t say I was a little nervous, but I psyched myself up as usual and went into beast mode. We went into the huddle, and our coach had called a passing play on our first play. I know not very smart all things considered. Walking up to the line I started really getting fired up and was ready to hit someone. I hear the quarterback yell out; “Red 180, Red 180, set!” I don’t really remember hearing the hut part. Before I knew what happened, I was face down on the turf, feeling like I got hit by a train. I pulled myself up to my knees, shook my head and said to myself, “This is going to be a long day!”

 It was a long day. I never worked so hard in my life trying to keep this grizzly bear with pads away from our quarterback. My attempts failed when our star running back was leveled and had his shoulder dislocated by the monster.

After the game was over and we were beat badly, I went over to congratulate the man who showed me that I was not ready for the pros as I had lead myself to believe. As I complimented him on his gameplay he very humbly said thank you and went on to tell me what a great job I did. After scoffing off the compliment I said to him, I need to know what is your workout routine? How in the heck did you get so strong and fast? He went on to tell me, he gets up every morning at 4 AM and runs (notice he said runs, not jogs) almost five miles to school. The coach lets him workout in the weight room before class, so he spends about three hours working out before class, then showers and heads to class. Then, of course, he has weight training & football practice after school, which afterward he runs back home.

Completely astonished, I could only bring up the word “WOW!” He responded to that with, “I gotta gain my second!” Puzzled, I asked him what he meant. He went on to tell me that he grew up in a very poor household and spent time watching superior athletes. He started playing football at the age of three and knew he wanted to go pro. Not only go pro, but be the best ever. He went on to tell me that he noticed at a very early age while watching the Olympics, that the difference between the one who wins the gold and the one who comes in last is usually only about a second or two. He said, “Can you imagine training your whole life for a single opportunity, and then to lose by only one second? Not only lose, but not even win a medal?”  So he explained to me that is why he has to train so hard. He has to gain his second. If he wants a better life for himself and his family, if he wants to go pro, if he wants to be the best, then he needs to work harder than anyone else. If he wants to gain that second he has to put everything he has into getting that second. It is very rare that you would ever meet a teenager with that level of focus.

It has been many years since that day, but I still remember it as if it were yesterday. Not knowing it at the time, his words would set me on a path of always trying to gain a second. Whether you call it sharpening your ax, or gaining your second, the truth is, if you want to be the best, you have to work harder than anyone else at achieving your goals. I wake up every morning and ask myself, “what can I do today to make myself a better husband, a better father, a better leader?” I may not call it gaining my second, but there is no doubt that the superhuman Cobra I once faced help put me on the path I currently travel, an almost sick obsession with being the best at everything I do.

I have told this story several times in the past, and I am always asked; “So who is the superhuman guy?” his name was Derrick Thomas, the best defensive end to ever play in the NFL. I only wish I could have let him know before he died what an impact his words had on my life. Good luck and go gain your second!

Thursday, April 12, 2018

It’s In The Bag

It’s In The Bag



The other day my wife was telling me about an experience she had at the grocery store. She was checking out and noticed the special attention the bag boy was paying to her weekly purchases. She went on to tell me that he was very considerate in the way he took the time to organize the contents, keeping the cold products together, not bagging the bread or eggs under something heavy, etc. We all know that some of this is just plain common sense; however she went on to point out that he didn’t mix any of the cleaning chemicals with the food bags, and kept the chips from being crushed into bits. He also took the time to make sure that the bags were not overloaded or too heavy, just a little extra on his part went a long way with my wife.

My wife made it a point to tell the bag boy what a great job he did. He was very thankful and said he had just started there. My wife, being the person she is, went over to the manager to let him know what a fantastic job the bag boy did. The manager thanked her, then walked over and complimented the new hire on a job well done. Then to her surprise, that manager told her that he was going to hold a meeting with all of the bagging personnel to make sure that everyone understood the process this new employee had used, and to make it store policy from that point forward.

There are so many lessons to be learned here:

The importance of customer feedback: As I have explained in multiple articles, you have to know what your customers are thinking. You also need to react and modify your procedures to promote the best possible customer experience.

Catching your team members doing something right:  The manager could have easily waited to say something to the bag boy, or even overlooked such a compliment. But he didn’t! He stopped what he was doing and went right over to compliment him.

The power of NOW:  The manager made it a point to change standard procedure right then to enhance the customer experience. There was no waiting around, submitting ideas, waiting for approvals. He implemented something that had a direct effect on the customer without hesitation, a man after my own heart.

I am pleased to say for the record this was a Publix supermarket. Publix has a reputation for great customer service and this is why. They empower their managers to make decisions that directly affect the customer experience and help the bottom line. (No, I do not own any stock in Publix; in fact I don’t even have any friends or family that work there. I just believe in giving recognition where it is due.)


Everyone can learn from this story. It is not necessarily the big promotional events and advertising that makes the difference. It’s not always about the lowest price! The real difference is in the small things that you do for your customer to make them feel special and let them know you care. My father always told me that, “anything worth doing is worth doing right”. Luckily for Publix, this bag boy understood that also, and made a difference to a major corporation. While most people would think of a bag boy as a position of low importance, the fact is that anyone can make a difference, and you need to instill a culture where everyone can contribute to the best practices of your company. You need to immediately compliment your team when they do something right and you need to use the power of NOW. Why? 

Because, if you do, the rest will be in the bag!